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3 Impacts of Bias on Engagement


In my last two posts I have addressed the "3 Mental Roadblocks to Engagement" and the "3 Steps to Overcoming the Mental Roadblocks to Engagement."   Of those 3 roadblocks, today I want to focus on personal bias.



"Interference" to engagement is often a result of personal bias. Failure to overcome, address, work through, or own your "personal bias" can have a damaging and long lasting impact on your ability to engage.

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Filters form.

Your personal bias impacts all you do.  It is a "filter" that is present in every "engagement transaction" in which you participate. While our biases are based on our personal experiences, they are only "our perceptions" of what we believe to be true.  

Failure to own, acknowledge, or address these perceptions grants our mind permission to create "filters." We naturally place these filters between us and those with whom we are attempting to engage.  Consequently, these perceptions - turned filters - become boundaries.  Most often, they are based on the "myths of our mind" which are based on the "stories" we tell ourselves.

Blind spots grow.

As your bias grows, it does so slowly.  As it becomes more and more invasive, it will begin to take over much of your thought process.  As it continues to grow, the filter of  - not good enough - for whatever reason you can contrive - may eventually stand between you and many others.  Consequently, your ability to "listen and see" will be diminished.  The ultimate result is that the feedback you desperately need to be successful, will be filtered.  Your personal "blind spots" will not only grow, they will do so in an unadulterated and unchecked fashion.

Blame is placed.

As your bias grows, and, as it begins to impact your willingness to receive feedback, you will begin to place blame on others.  Typically, it will be to cover for your own inadequacies.  This growing and invasive bias - accompanied with unchecked blind spots - will eventually convince you that you are "never" the problem and the blame belongs to others.  "Those students are the reason... those customers are the reason... those managers are the reason... those parents are the reason... etc. etc. etc."

This is a great book about personal accountability.
(Click it to get it!)

Engagement matters!

The ability to engage others leads to countless possibilities and opportunities. Whether those opportunities are in the classroom, the teacher's lounge, or the CEO's office - engagement matters!

Acknowledging, addressing, and owning your personal bias is critical to ensuring that your filters do not stand in the way of your own success!

Failing to understand the impact of bias on engagement and how to overcome it may slow both personal and organizational success and growth.

As always – if you would like to learn more about this topic - or - book me to speak with your organization - or - discuss coaching opportunities, 
operators are standing by!


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