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Showing posts from October, 2017

3 Behaviors of "Great Engagers" That You Can Also Do

I am frequently asked to identify common behaviors of great engagers.  Considering the frequency of that request, I have composed a list of behaviors that are easily accessible to all of us!
Below are 3 behaviors of great engagers.  These 3 behaviors can be employed by anyone to improve their personal engagement ability.
Be Present.Being present sets you apart from most people. The key to being present is to truly focus your undivided attention to the human directly in front of you. If multiple humans are present, share the attention. Again, being present sets you apart from most people. Be different by being present.
Be Polite.Being polite is a lost art. This, like being present, will set you apart from most people. The challenge for many is to be genuinely polite. While I realize that in challenging engagements, this may be problematic. Even in the most challenging engagement, there is not substitute for being polite. Being polite communicates respect.


Be Personable.Being personable is…

Friday with Friends - "The Myth of Employee Burnout" by Matt Heller

Friday with Friends - Matt Heller, author. I have known Matt for many years and have had the opportunity to see the results of his work as a facilitator, speaker, consultant and author!


His book "The Myth of Employee Burnout" is a great read for any organizational leader.  Burnout, causes many issues, the least of which is poor engagement.
Without further ado: Matt and his thoughts on "The Myth of Employee Burnout."
People have asked me how long it took for me to write “The Myth of Employee Burnout?" My answer? 25 years!

In many ways, it’s a culmination of the lessons I learned both as an employee and a leader.  The book outlines my quest to find the "truth" behind why people “burnout" - or - lose motivation.  I have seen so many people start off strong, enthused, eager, and engaged - but then somewhere along the line  -fizz out.  They turned into the "lackadaisical employees" many leaders complain about.

Being in the amusement park i…

3 Impacts of Low Expectations on Engagement

Low expectations yield poor performance.
Further, continually setting low expectations continually yields poor performance. In fact, setting low expectations - intentionally or not - grants permission for poor performance.


Over time, the setting of low expectations becomes inherent to “what” we do. It results in continual and ongoing interference to both effective and meaningful engagement.
Why?
Because the mindset of “low expectations” crafts "matching behavior." When these occur, we may blame others for poor performance, when in reality, they are responding to the “low expectations” that have been set by us.
You may recall that I identified the "3 Mental Roadblocks to Engagement" and the "3 Steps to Overcoming them." Of those 3 roadblocks, today’s focus is on the impact of “low expectations” as they relate to effective and meaningful engagement.
Failure to effectively address "low expectations" and their impact on the engagement process can…

3 Results on Engagement from Lack of Accountability

Personal Accountability : Powerful and Practical Ideas for You and Your Organization Three results on effective engagement from the lack of personal and organizational accountability:Placing blameVictim thinkingProcrastination Each person and organization needs a practical approach to eliminating blame, victim thinking, and procrastination.

By walking the high road - the path to personal and organizational accountability - we can achieve greater levels of excellence and leadership in our lives, both at work and at home.

If you or your organization is searching to improve personal accountability, I suggest this book!

The ideas presented in this book are pragmatic and readily applied.



Failing to understand the results on engagement from lack of accountability and how to overcome it may slow both personal and organizational success and growth.
As always – if you would like to learn more about this topic - or - book me to speak with your organization - or - discuss coaching opportunities, 

3 Impacts of Bias on Engagement

In my last two posts I have addressed the "3 Mental Roadblocks to Engagement" and the "3 Steps to Overcoming the Mental Roadblocks to Engagement."   Of those 3 roadblocks, today I want to focus on personal bias.



"Interference" to engagement is often a result of personal bias. Failure to overcome, address, work through, or own your "personal bias" can have a damaging and long lasting impact on your ability to engage.
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___________________________________________________ Filters form. Your personal bias impacts all you do.  It is a "filter" that is present in every "engagement transaction" in which you participate. While our biases are based on our personal experiences, they are only "our perceptions" of what we believe to be true.  
Failure to own, acknowledge, or address these perceptions grants our mind permission to create "filters." We naturally place the…

3 Steps to Overcoming the Mental Roadblocks to Engagement

In my last post - "3 Mental Roadblocks to Engagement" - I introduced you to the thoughts of  "interference" to engagement as a result of personal bias, low expectations, and selfish ambitions.

The ability to engage others leads to countless possibilities and opportunities. Whether those opportunities are in the classroom, the teacher's lounge, or the CEO's office - engagement matters!

3 Steps to Overcoming the Mental Roadblocks to Engagement Acknowledge your bias. Your personal filters and lenses are present in every transaction. Before you begin, be honest with yourself and acknowledge that your view(s) may be biased and your perspectives clouded. Acknowledging bias is critical to engagement. Acknowledging bias creates an opportunity for substantial personal growth and reflection.
Set high expectations. Never doubt the possibilities. Never.

When you start an engagement transaction, set the bar high. If you believe your presence will not matter, it won&#…

3 Mental Roadblocks to Engagement

The ability to engage in conversation(s) leads to countless possibilities and opportunities. Whether those opportunities are in the classroom, the teacher's lounge, the CEO's office, the workspace, the coffee station, or on the sales floor - engaged conversations are important.  Engagement matters!

The Benefits of Engagement When it comes to effective and meaningful engagement, I have often been my own worst enemy. My experiences have taught me that I am not alone in creating “mental roadblocks” to my own success with "effective and meaningful" engagement.

Many people I have coached and consulted have the same issue.  Below are a few of the “mental road blocks” that may need to be addressed in the engagement processes. Identifying and “owning” these roadblocks may allow us to seize more opportunities for creating "effective and meaningful" engagement.

Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships by Daniel Goleman 3 Roadblocks to Engagment P…

Engagement Requires Habit

hab·it ˈhabət/ noun 1. a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.
The ability to engage in conversation(s) leads to countless possibilities and opportunities.  Whether those opportunities are in the classroom, the teacher's lounge, the CEO's office, the workspace or at the coffee station, water fountain, or on the sales floor - engaged conversations are important.
Effective engagement requires the "habit" of engaging!
Ideas lead to mindset, mindset to behavior, and repeated behavior to habit.  Continual commitment to employing the engagement cycle in communication transactions is required to move from effective engagement to meaningful engagement.  

Click it to get it!

What are you doing to develop habits of engagement?
I want to suggest you read some of my earlier posts regarding engagement.  Also, if you have not read "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" - I want to invite you to read it.

4 Attributes of Engaged Conversations

The ability to engage in conversation(s) leads to countless possibilities and opportunities. Whether those opportunities are in the classroom, the teacher's lounge, the CEO's office, the workspace, the coffee station, or on the sales floor - engaged conversations are important.



The following list provides "4 Attributes of Engaged Conversations" that I have learned that are critically important to the engagement process.

Be courteous.  Make it your goal to maintain the demeanor of any conversation.  Kindness communicates respect. 

Be calm.  Great leaders know that there is no substitute for remaining calm, even in the most challenging set of circumstances, remain calm.  Calmness communicates stability.

Be consistent.  When information is consistently, accurately, and fairly delivered; improvement, growth, and difficult situations being resolved can all occur. Consistency communicates clarity.

Be honest.This means be free of deception, including, deceptions provided by your…

3 Values of Honesty

Honesty is a key component in all effective engagement transactions.  In fact, honesty is critical to the entire engagement transaction.  



The ability to engage leads to countless possibilities and opportunities. (Learning, growth, sales, etc.)   In fact, it leads to endless opportunities regardless of whether those opportunities are in the classroom, teacher's lounge, CEO's office, workspace, or on the sales floor. 

Honesty creates opportunity for effective engagement.  Dishonesty will kill it.


So, what is honesty? Most people answer that question with "truthfulness" however, it is much, much, more. 

Honesty moves beyond truthfulness.People can be "truthful" while intentionally omitting important details, events, times, and other critical data. Honesty is maintaining the truth - and - providing the entire story, even when it is uncomfortable. 

Honesty is  safe. Creating a "safe" transaction is critical to effective engagement.  The delivery of "h…

3 Traits of Integrity

Integrity is more than simple honesty, it defines "who" you are and "how" you handle life.  It is a key driver to engagement and engagement drives success.


Three Character Traits of Integrity:
Soundness: An unimpaired condition.Incorruptibility: A firm adherence to a code of especially moral or artistic values.Completeness: The quality or state of being complete or undivided Integrity gives rise to the unique ability to "pull" things together, to make it all happen no matter how challenging the circumstances.

I have learned that people with integrity tend to: Connect well with othersEasily build trustFinish wellPossess a strong view of realityLet their "yes be yes" and their "no be no" Integrity is not something that you either have or don't.  It can be developed, grown and shared. As I wrap this up, I am reminded of one of my favorite writing on the top by Dr. Henry Cloud - "Integrity - The Courage to Meet the Demand of Reality!&…

4 Keys to Authentic Engagement

Engagement leads to the possibility of  creating relationship.  Relationship leads to a myriad of opportunities. (Learning, growth, sales, etc.)



Authentic engagement creates opportunity.  In fact, it leads to endless opportunities regardless of whether those are in the classroom, the teacher's lounge, the CEO's office, the workspace, or the sales floor.  Opportunities become available with authentic engagement.

4 Keys to Authentic Engagement:
Be present. Focus undivided attention to the people - and/or - tasks at hand. If multiple people or things are present, share the attention.Be honest. Honesty is freedom of deception.  Honesty is more than truthfulness.  People can be truthful while intentionally omitting important details, data, events, times, and other factors.  Honesty is maintaining the truth - and - providing the entire story.  Honesty requires freedom from deception. No tricks, no gimmicks - transparency is the "name of the game!"Be real. Vulnerability does n…