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Meaningful Engagement: The Pink Bat

One question that frequently emerges in my growth development sessions is this: How do I address "bad stuff?"

So often people search for the "right" words to address behavior. Do we call it constructive criticism?

What does does it "sound like" to bring problems to light?

Often I catch people off guard and say "is it possible that what you see as problems may in fact be opportunities?"


Seeing opportunities - not problems - is critical for an engagement based mindset.
(This can easily be applied to business by substituting "students" with "employees.")

The Pink Bat
For every problem, there exists a solution…and at the very least…an opportunity.

A critical step in meaningful engagement is learning to spot opportunities. So often, in the cycle of engagement people disrupt it by pointing to "problems" instead of seeing opportunities.

Everywhere you look today there are problems. Turn on your TV or computer—pick up a magazine or paper—and what do you see? Problems!

Talk to your spouse, coworkers, family members, or friends, and within minutes, someone will bring up a problem…or two, or three. Problems permeate the workplace, too—new products, old products, customer service, health care, retirement plans, sales, marketing, budgets, IT, personnel—the list of problems we confront each day is vast.

Michael McMillan’s newest release, Pink Bat, may provide you an opportunity to turn your thinking upside down and get you and the people around you seeing opportunities.

Pink Bat: Turning Problems into Solutions is a must-read for everyone who lives in the world of education, business, or is a part of any organization. In fact, I predict that once you read it, you’ll want everyone in your company to do the same.


Click It to Get It



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